The Danger of Self ID Policies in Women’s Combat Sport

The following blog post was contributed by an anonymous writer.

I have been involved in boxing for a long time, and it is a brutal, violent and dangerous sport. In a boxing match, there are two trained fighters in an enclosed space trying to hurt one another. The object is to score points, but let’s be realistic, in competition boxers try to hurt their opponent, break hearts, noses and ribs, to make the referee step in and stop the fight. Blood, broken bones and nasty injuries are a frequent occurrence. Serious injury is not uncommon, debilitating injuries are not infrequent, and death in the ring is not unheard of.

Over the years, efforts have been made to make boxing safer. There are weight categories and experience categories in competitions. You will not see an experienced boxer competing against a novice, and you will not see a heavyweight pitted against a flyweight. Boxers also undergo strict and consistent medical evaluation, but despite all of these measures boxing remains a dangerous sport.

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A Scottish Hostelling Experience

Note: This blog post was originally published on the ManFriday website.

Most people are probably aware that Hostelling Scotland (previously the Scottish Youth Hostel Association) is a charity that provides affordable accommodation in many scenic locations throughout Scotland. Much of that accommodation is in the form of shared dormitories, rooms filled with bunk beds where weary travellers can rest and socialise. For many years these dorms have been single-sex where guests are allocated a bed based on whether they are male or female.

What most people are probably not aware of however, is that this is no longer the case.  There’s no reason why they should be aware, since no policy change or information is given on the website, and guests still book in as either male or female.  Despite this, Hostelling Scotland have confirmed by email that, “Regardless of transgendered status, we will book an accommodation based on how our guests choose to be recognised.” Continue reading

Self-ID and Driving Licences

Note: This blog post was originally published on the ManFriday website.

I’ve frequently read on Twitter of claims that the proposed changes to the Gender Recognition Act will merely be an extension of the self-identification processes we already have for passports and driving licences.

This was news to me.  It was a long time ago admittedly, but I seem to recall needing my birth certificate when I first applied for a driving licence.  So I thought I’d investigate a bit further. Google took me to justbeyourself.org.uk which explained the peculiarities of how a person’s sex is shown on their driving licence: section 5 shows your driving number: the seventh character of which is either 0 or 1 for male, or 5 or 6 for female.  Checked my licence: yip, a five for me. Continue reading